detour

About a month ago, one of my cousins and I were headed back to Salt Lake from The Ranch. I was following him. It's normally an hour and a half drive. Just as we passed Park City, the highway turned in to a parking lot. We got separated. Thank goodness for cellphones. After sitting in traffic with no idea when it would clear or how long it would take, he called and suggested an alternate route. It required taking the next exit, sort of within sight, then going back a few miles and an extra hour. He promised it would be pretty. I would have taken him up on it regardless, but he's the one person on the planet I'd follow blindly into the wilderness. 

glorious view

glorious view

It ended up being a magical detour. Kept me all smiles for days. Turned out a semi-truck had caught fire. No one was injured. 

summer

It's been a busy summer between work, Yoga Teacher Training, getting settled in a new apartment, trying to get away to the country for a day here and there, and managing my garden at Withers'. 

The garden has been such a fun transformation to see. It is definitely hard work. Below you can see what it looked like in April before and after I tilled the soil to prep for planting seeds. 

Looking west above before and after, east below before and after

Looking west above before and after, east below before and after

Looking North

Looking North

It was just after I planted all my seeds--carrots, beets, peas, broccoli, green onion, that the metaphorical seeds I planted for my life in Salt Lake last fall and winter started to sprout. Eventually, the seeds in the literal garden sprouted, too.

Growing!

Growing!

Broccoli

Broccoli

Irrigation water is a new experience for me. It's amazing because it does its thing and you don't have to spend time watering every day.

Vertical Element

Vertical Element

Peas

Peas

Beets!

Beets!

Before and After: Late Winter and Summer

Before and After: Late Winter and Summer

I've installed a brick path along the length of the garden. Recently, I acquired more bricks and pavers to create a path from the entrance to my garden. They will be installed this week, pics coming soon. 

#umbrellacorpse at alchemy coffee

I hung the collection of umbrella corpses at Alchemy earlier this month. we had a fun party. sold a few pieces. It's been very well received, more so than I expected. It's been fun working there while my stuff is hanging. I've had so many opportunities to talk to people about my work!

Alchemy has such a great vibe.

Alchemy has such a great vibe.

$5 umbrellas

$5 umbrellas

Winter Group

Winter Group

In love with graph paper right now, maybe forever

In love with graph paper right now, maybe forever

My favorite.

My favorite.

Artist Statement

Artist Statement

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It's still up through the end of May. Come check it out and say hi! 

390 E 1700 S, Salt Lake City, UT 84115

collages

I can't believe how fast April is becoming the past. While seeds in my garden have been busy sprouting, I've been working on some collages that will be hanging at Alchemy next month. (The opening is May 6, 7pm!) Most of them were finished or mostly finished when I moved to Salt Lake, but I started a new one on 20 x 36 cradled wood panel. I love the way it turned out. 

In Progress...

In Progress...

Rolled paper detail

Rolled paper detail

I needed some texture and depth, so I added rolled strips of paper. Looking forward to using this on future work. 

Dots added

Dots added

This piece was mostly finished, but the pink in the background was a little distracting and overwhelming, maybe the yellow, too. The umbrella corpses speak for themselves, so I do not want them to get lost or obscured. Adding the dots in various shades of green solved the problem. I fixed the spring situation, too. Now the umbrella corpse image is mounted on four fat springs instead of one thin spring. Stabilizing. 

New springs attached for stability.

New springs attached for stability.

Rigor Mortis

Rigor Mortis

Winter Corpse

Winter Corpse

20th and Broadway

20th and Broadway

One of my favorites. Somehow, the dots anchor the larger circles. Before the circles were just sort of floating. A dot placed at each red strip intersection unifies the whole piece. How lucky to have the photo laying around, the colors work perfectly.  (Years ago there was an exhibit following the March 11 Tsunami.  I took a photo of several framed artifacts with soft focus, a happy accident. I wanted to use it for something, it finally found a place.)

I have 36 total to hang. 23 of those are 5 x 5 images mounted on 5 x 5 panels with collage around the cradled edges. The remaining 13 vary: 6 x 6, 8 x 8, 10 x 10. Can't wait to see them together on the wall, and the party of course will be fun. 

 

 

women's march

the march last monday in salt lake city was really powerful. i took my 79-year old cousin along with me. he has spent so much of his life fighting for wildlife in this state. we wondered how many people would show. I was hoping for 7,000 people. 10,000 people turned out.

gathering at city creek park

gathering at city creek park

inside the capitol

inside the capitol

before reaching capacity (5,000) inside 

before reaching capacity (5,000) inside 

there are no #alternativefacts

there are no #alternativefacts

signs outside capitol

signs outside capitol

what a great day! so much positive energy. i hope the momentum continues. 

juicy adventures

My juicer has found a new home in my cousin's kitchen. We have made three different kinds so far. We started with this one:

a beet, a bunch of celery, one cucumber, five carrots from the garden, one lemon and an inch of ginger. It was ok--more lemon and ginger may have helped.

Next we did a detox green juice recipe New Years Day morning.  We both loved it and would make it again.

one bunch of celery, five kale leaves, one green apple, one big handful of flat parsley from the garden, one lime, one lemon, and an inch of ginger.

After we finished that, I juiced 4 white grapefruits because white grapefruit makes me happy big time. I love having it around, and I love that it's in season this time of year. I've enjoyed drinking a short glass of it the last couple of days. I can't remember how much it costs at the grocery store for a quart of fresh squeezed, but it was 4.59 lbs of grapefruit @ $1.49/lb. Over $6, but the yield was more than 32oz. (Probably 40oz?) Not bad. 

A friend gave me a little journal long ago that I've turned into a juice recipe book. Some of them I've found online to try and evaluate, but I've left most of it blank for coming concoctions to be recorded and evaluated. 

 

 

Holiday Gift Tags

I made these gift tags a couple of nights ago. I'm excited to attach them to the pottery I've been making to give away as christmas gifts. I haven't decided what I'll use for string yet. It may be too late to find hemp cord. 

Instead I chose raffia because I had it on hand. White is nice with red dominate tags anyway, and the natural raffia works well, too. 

#yardwaste

I've mentioned previously that I love that SLC collects yard waste. The city collects it curbside and composts it. 

From SLC Green Blog:

Curbside Compost: Also known as the yard waste program, or the tan can, curbside composting is made easy with a 90 gallon bin picked up weekly. Currently the tan can is “vegan” – meaning it only accepts green waste. The wheels are in motion to expand curbside composting to accept more forms of food waste, so stay tuned! In the meantime, maximize your curbside bin with tea bags and coffee grounds.
 

Many friends asked what would be my next photo series--post-umbrella corpse. I think I've found it in the daily compost collection. It combines things I love--cooking plant based diet, gardening, environmental stewardship, and beautiful imagery. 

garden trimmings

garden trimmings

apple flowers eggs and coffee grounds

apple flowers eggs and coffee grounds

pomegranate cabbage and green onions

pomegranate cabbage and green onions

pistachios and spinach

pistachios and spinach

It was not intentional to carry the discarded theme, but there it is again. It came together organically, no pun intended. 

editing

I've picked up a new word, editing. It's not so much that the word is new, but it's usage. A person can edit her purse or a bookshelf. She can edit a cupboard or a magazine collection. Editing can take five minutes or a year. Anything can be edited, really. It's really just a euphemism for clearing clutter. 

My first feng shui project here in Salt Lake is a massive editing project. We've started in the basement with the smallest of three rooms. It is a room intended for storage. 

Not to scale, but you get the idea

Not to scale, but you get the idea

Rule number one when editing is to be kind to yourself. If you aren't ready to go through a box, set it aside for later editing. Don't beat yourself up about anything. It took 2 people 21 hours to edit this room over the course of a weekend. Rule number two is trust the process. Remember when you clear out objects that no longer serve a purpose in your life, you create space for new objects or activities to come in to your life.

Storage Room

Storage Room

Looks a little intimidating. We took everything out shelf by shelf. As with any editing project, many items were recycled  or donated, some was discarded to landfill, and the rest was kept and organized back onto a shelf. 

To be edited

To be edited

One of the goals was to create space for wrapping gifts and other tasks that relate to the contents of the storage space. 

Same view as above, post edit

Same view as above, post edit

Holiday and seasonal decorations distinctly organized

Holiday and seasonal decorations distinctly organized

Organized china

Organized china

Work surface in the center for wrapping gifts or other tasks

Work surface in the center for wrapping gifts or other tasks

Organized window screens

Organized window screens

Editing is a continuous process. There's still work to be done, but the most labor intensive and time consuming part is complete. We only needed to purchase one additional shelving unit for the back section of the space. In future plastic bins may replace cardboard boxes (they deteriorate), but you don't have to spend much just to get organized. 

fav things about SLC

1. Gardens of all kinds everywhere. So much grows here! Tomatoes, zucchini, squash, arugula, cabbage, broccoli, cucumber, grapes. It's wonderful. Also all the fruit trees! Peaches, apricots, plums, apples, pears. 

2. Solar panels. Totally normal and everywhere. 

3. The mountains are right here. 

4. Wildlife. Not just mustangs, but also pronghorns, elk, moose, deer, quail, fish, ducks...

5. Bookstores: Central Book Exchange is my favorite so far. I bought a copy of Heidi Julavits' The Folded Clock: A Diary the other day on my second visit. I hadn't read any of her work before, but remember her name from working in the Graduate Writing Department at Columbia. 

6. Farm to table restaurants, craft beer, coffee shop culture. Still tons of places I want to check out. Hands down my favorite coffee shop is Alchemy. I discovered it while still in Brooklyn, and it has not disappointed. 

7.  So many hiking trails. I've been up Emigration Canyon, but there are other places still to explore. Looking forward to checking out the Jordan River Parkway Trail. There's really not a shortage of outdoor activities here. 

8.  This place: NHMU Rio Tinto Center. Such an amazing cultural space designed by Ennead Architects

9.  Yard Waste. They collect it. When I was living in Queens years ago, it was announced one neighborhood in the City would pilot a compost collecting program. Not sure what happened, but it wasn't implemented in my Brooklyn neighborhood before I departed NYC. 

10. Everyone has dogs! We've been so lucky autumn has been hanging on. Last weekend I went with a cousin and her dogs to Parley's Nature Park. I was told it's a dog park, but it's more like a great place to go walking with off leash dogs. They love it--multiple water features and lots of great smells. Not the same as hiking in the woods, but it's still great. I'd only ever been to dog parks where people sit around while the dogs play. That's boring! It's fun to watch the dogs have a joyful time, but more fun to walk while watching dogs. 

I'm certain this list will grow. It's a wonderful place full of new experiences.

 

utah

Well Utah is a special place. Mountains are enchanting and striking. Make me feel grounded and connected to the planet. It’s fascinating to see evidence of geologic history, hundreds of millions of years. And they are still evolving!

People ask me if I miss New York. Like thousands of other single women who live in the City, I thought of New York as my boyfriend. Who needs a boyfriend when you have New York. Now New York is my ex-boyfriend, or my boyfriend at the time. An extraordinary run we had, 7 years. With any ex-boyfriend, I can reminisce fondly about the experience and acknowledge it was time to move on. I didn’t see it coming, it was like a switch flipped. I went from being a person who couldn’t imagine living anywhere but New York to become a person who was starving to live in a place where I could be connected to family and nature. While New York is a magical place, it’s magical out here, too. 

Many were surprised when I announced where I planned to move. To me, it wasn’t a far stretch. My grandfather and his sister Emily were very close. She moved out to Utah from Chicago after her husband finished law school. It was the early 1930s. He had asthma, and his doctor told him to move to Utah or Arizona. I’m so grateful they chose Salt Lake City. It is an extraordinary place. When my mother was growing up, her family would drive to Utah from Chicago (before the interstate she always points out) to visit her aunt, uncle and two cousins who were 11 and 13 years older than she.  My grandfather used to spit out the window while he drove. Once they arrived, it was always an exceptional time. As an adult she continued to make the trip out. By this time her cousins were married and starting their families. After my parents married, they continued the traditional visits. They did so the summer before I was born. As the story goes, they had such a wonderful time, they decided to name me Emily after my mom’s aunt. 

Emily and Emily

Emily and Emily

When I was in college it occurred to me that I may have been conceived in Utah. It makes a good story, anyway. 7 years after I graduated while at dinner in Chicago with my dad, my boyfriend at the time (not New York) forced my dad to confirm whether or not I was in fact conceived in Utah. I was mortified then heartbroken. It wasn’t until after I moved here, I realized I was already an embryo! That means I had all the influences swirling around when I was just beginning. My grandfather and his sister were 78 and 76 when I was born. Opa died when I was 8. We never lived in the same city, so I didn’t get to know him well, even with annual visits. Emily died when I was a senior in high school. I may have only had two visits with her, the last one a couple of years before she died. 

With one of my second cousins, I organized a reunion for our family last August. We had talked about it for a few years after connecting on Facebook.  None of us is getting any younger. My parents are in their late 60s now and my mom’s cousins are in their 80s. I hadn’t seen them in 22 years. I don’t even feel old enough for that to be a fact. We’re all grown up. All of my second cousins have families of their own. Some of their kids are in college. One of the most unique things about being here is that we range in age from 7 to 83. How wonderful. 

foraging

One of my first adventures in Salt Lake City was attending a foraging class. How fun, right? There's so much around to forage: mushrooms, berries, fruits, nuts. I'm looking forward to spring, we were shown where there are Ume trees. How wonderful it would be to make umeboshi plums. 

This oyster mushroom was foraged by my cousin. She got half of it, then when back for more. Overall, the multi-trip forage yielded about 5lbs of oyster mushroom delight. Much smaller oyster mushrooms sell for $5.99/lb at a local market. 

Beautiful Oyster Mushroom.

Beautiful Oyster Mushroom.

We experimented cooking it with different oils and butters to find out what the best flavor is. (olive oil, sesame oil, grapeseed oil, salted butter, and vegan butter) Butter was by far the best flavor, but they were all fun and delicious. I would be okay with vegan butter. The oils may have been helped with more salt. 

On a field trip to a local park, I picked a bunch of inky cap mushrooms. You really need a large basketful to have enough to share generously.

Inky Caps.

Inky Caps.

Inky Caps.

Inky Caps.

The caps get gooey, so we only ate the stems. I wish I had sauteed them right away instead of waiting until the next morning, but it was a fantastic first forage. 

Elderberries are delicious. I want to make muffins and syrup with them. They're like little candies, so delicious and tart. These I did not harvest, but I did the painstaking job of removing them from their persnickety stems. Totally worth it. 

Elderberries.

Elderberries.

I had the most fun foraging pine nuts. We spent an hour pulling the nuts out of pine cones from the trees. Unfortunately, I didn't weigh our harvest. Not all of them have an edible nut inside, but finding out is part of the fun.

Foraged Pine Nuts.

Foraged Pine Nuts.

Does it count as foraging if you pick from the garden? Maybe not, but it's still fun. These plums came from a tree in the backyard where I am staying. 

Plums.

Plums.

road trip

I arrived in Salt Lake City a week ago after a 4-day road trip across the country from Brooklyn with my mother. New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, and Wyoming. 

Gary, Indiana was the first interesting stop. I wanted to see Michael Jackson's boyhood home. The neighborhood is partially abandoned. On his street, many homes are boarded, while on surrounding streets earth is reclaiming land. Large swaths of empty overgrown lots made it feel post-apocalyptic. 

Jackson Family home.

Jackson Family home.

House across the street from Jackson Family home. 

House across the street from Jackson Family home. 

In the neighborhood around the corner, so much decay. 

I hope Gary will experience a renaissance. 

Next stop was Chicago. It's changed so much since I was there last in 2009. We had lunch at my aunt's house and picked up an umbrella stand. Long story, short version: My mom's dad gave it to my dad's sister when they moved into the house nearly 40 years ago because he was friends with the family who built the house. Now they're selling the house and the umbrella stand will stay in the family. It was a delightful visit.

From there we continued on, stopping in Iowa City to see the University of Iowa. Love the eclectic mix of architecture on campus, especially Hancher, the performing arts center by Pelli Clarke Pelli. 

Arts Building West by Steven Holl was also a treat to see. 

We continued on through the rolling hills of Iowa and spent the night in Des Moines, a little farther than halfway to SLC.  We were both exhausted from two straight days of 8+ hours in the car. We had to drive across the busy state highway from our hotel (not because we were exhausted, but it wasn't pedestrian-friendly) to a Bennigan's (the other choices were Taco Bell, Wendy's or McDonald's) for a snack and a glass of wine. 

Celebrating the halfway mark!

Celebrating the halfway mark!

Rolling hills transitioned to cornfields. 

Somewhere in Nebraska after all of the cornfields, the midwest starts becoming the west. It's stunning. I was driving, so not many pics. 

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Sinclair saddled up

Sinclair saddled up

The final night we stayed in Cheyenne, a great Old West town. We drove around a bit before dinner. I love all the old buildings and signs. 

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The next morning we stopped a few hours outside of Cheyenne for coffee. Not much was open except for Rifleman. I went in to ask the whereabouts of Penny's Diner. There were four rugged old timers sitting at the bar at 7:45am. 

I thought only bars in New York are open at 6am, and on a Sunday to boot.

I thought only bars in New York are open at 6am, and on a Sunday to boot.

Some people think Wyoming is boring, but I think it is really beautiful. The iPhone doesn't really do it justice. Most of the 6.5 hours was spent in it. Desolate and magical. 

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We finally made it! 

Autumn color in the mountains.

Autumn color in the mountains.

Woot! We reached our exit.

Woot! We reached our exit.

wild horses + land art

Utah is a magical place. Last weekend 13 of us piled into two cars and made the trip out to Spiral Jetty with a stop at Golden Spike Monument

On the way to the Jetty from Golden Spike there's roughly a 20-mile drive on washboard road surrounded by beautiful mountainous desert landscape. There we encountered wild horses (mustangs) crossing our path. Horses can represent wild freedom, free expression, gentle grace and beauty. They are powerful, free and wild. They are also a problem because they reproduce too fast, have no predators, and overgraze among other issues.  

When we finally reached Spiral Jetty, it was surprising to see so many other people there. There were at least three or four other cars parked, and we passed people leaving as we were approaching. Definitely off the beaten path. Fortunately (depending on your perspective), the lake water was low, the Jetty is not always visible depending on water level. After walking the spiral, we walked another half mile across the white salt desert to the edge of the lake. Felt like being on a different planet. 

For a sense of scale, there are two people standing in the center of the Spiral. 

For a sense of scale, there are two people standing in the center of the Spiral. 

Reminds me of the Moon

Reminds me of the Moon

Salt crystals

Salt crystals

Red Algea

Red Algea

Definitely a worthwhile pilgrimage, the horses made it more magical. 

ending and beginning

A couple of weeks ago, I was a person who had 1 hot pink umbrella with 2 broken ribs. Over a period of 5 days, I became a person who has 1 cheap, but long-lasting black umbrella, 1 cheap short-poled black umbrella, 1 heavy duty blue umbrella with a wooden handle and a corporate logo, and 1 hot pink umbrella with 3 broken ribs. 

About a month before this transformation occurred, I began thinking about where I would dispose the hot pink umbrella when the time arrives. (She had one broken rib at the time.) I can't just ditch her in any garbage can. I won't just toss her out with my kitchen garbage, as I have many times with others.

Now that I have more umbrellas than I need, it might be time to let her go. She is broken, although still functional -- she provides more coverage than the cheap short-poled black umbrella. She puts me in a happier mood than the cheap, but long lasting black umbrella. He's so boring and everywhere. He's the umbrella you have because you didn't have your umbrella that day when it started raining, but at least you know what you are getting. The heavy duty umbrella with a corporate logo is super nice. He can withstand 50 mph winds and has an ergonomic wooden handle! Highest quality umbrella I have ever had, but I can't do midnight blue or corporate logo for my go-to. It's just not part of my costume, unless the alternative is getting soaked. 

My quest to find a magical green spot for broken, battered, hot pink umbrella began this morning at Brooklyn Bridge Park. We still have spots to hit, rain or shine, before we part. 

Brooklyn Bridge Park. July 19, 2016.

Brooklyn Bridge Park. July 19, 2016.

umbrella corpses for everyone

8 x 8" wood panel with 1-1/2" cradle, acrylic, magazine paper, photographic print. $350.

8 x 8" wood panel with 1-1/2" cradle, acrylic, magazine paper, photographic print. $350.

I have received more responses to this image than any other to date.  Taken one morning on Parkside Avenue on my way to work, it's one image that people have been drawn to. Shown in greater context than most of the other umbrella corpses, social commentary dominates in this environmental portrait. 

6 x 6" mixed media collage on 1 -1/2" cradled wood panel. printed photo, paper, magazine. $250. 

6 x 6" mixed media collage on 1 -1/2" cradled wood panel. printed photo, paper, magazine. $250. 

I love this umbrella corpse mostly for its ruffles. It reminds me of a flower that has been plucked from its stem. I also love the bright colors on the paper around the border. 

6 x 6" wood panel with 1-1/2 cradle, photo print, magazine. $250.

6 x 6" wood panel with 1-1/2 cradle, photo print, magazine. $250.

Why I remember that I found this one at the corner of 14th and 4th, I have no idea. I was on my way to Jam Paper, several years ago. I love it's form, and that it's abandoned on a street corner next to a lamppost.

4 - 5 x 5" photos mounted on wood panel with 7/8" cradle. $350. 

4 - 5 x 5" photos mounted on wood panel with 7/8" cradle. $350. 

While each of these could stand alone, I like the 4 of them together. It could be because they were all shot in the same neighborhood, but the additional elements of bicycle wheels, architecture and street scenes thread them together. 

5 x 5" printed photo mounted on wood panel with 7/8" cradle. $50.

5 x 5" printed photo mounted on wood panel with 7/8" cradle. $50.

I love this one from Montreal. (Not a surprise there were several umbrella corpses there, they get the same windy, rainy days that we do here in New York.) It seems dignified resting against a bright blue fence on the edge of a garden.

5 x 5" printed photo mounted on wood panel with 7/8" cradle. $50.

5 x 5" printed photo mounted on wood panel with 7/8" cradle. $50.

This one was left hanging on a chainlink fence in my old neighborhood in Queens. That's astroturf beyond the fence!

5 x 5" printed photo mounted on wood panel with 7/8" cradle. $50.

5 x 5" printed photo mounted on wood panel with 7/8" cradle. $50.

This was taken on Wall Street. It reminds me of a time when I was a kid, my dad told me about someone who had dropped dead of a heart attack and was dead "before he hit the pavement". Macabre, I know. 

5 x 5" printed photo mounted on wood panel with 7/8" cradle. $50.

5 x 5" printed photo mounted on wood panel with 7/8" cradle. $50.

This one I remember, too, I was walking up Sixth Avenue with a former coworker near Herald Square. It's the iconic $5 umbrella, sold on the street when it rains. They can last a really long time, much longer than some that cost more than twice as much. Why it was abandoned at a newsstand is anyone's guess. 

5 x 5" mixed media on 7/8" cradled wood panel. Paper, magazine, acrylic, photo print. $125.

5 x 5" mixed media on 7/8" cradled wood panel. Paper, magazine, acrylic, photo print. $125.

I love so much about this one: red umbrella corpse, bright blue bicycle, luscious green summertime grass. It's one of my favorite images to stand alone at larger scale. But when I spotted the illustration of a bicycle in a magazine, I wanted to use it with this image. It's another one from Montreal. 

scratching lounge

Years ago, probably 10 or 12, I had surplus wood scraps and fabric samples. Naturally, I covered the wood with fabric samples for cats to enjoy.  

Today, I received this photo of a cat, Echo, who has clearly been enjoying her scratching lounge for a decade. She has used it well! I am delighted to hear she lounges around on it and scratches it every day.

Echo, being a cat on her scratching lounge.

Echo, being a cat on her scratching lounge.

Oliver with one of the early versions:

Knoll fabric.

Knoll fabric.

With spool and hemp, had to make it fun for the humans of the house.

With spool and hemp, had to make it fun for the humans of the house.

The only image I could find of this one, which went to Donovan.

The only image I could find of this one, which went to Donovan.

scavenger hunt

I heart Open House New York and the Museum of the City of New York. 

From the ridiculously fun Zoning Scavenger Hunt over the weekend:

Here we are in the plaza at 140 Broadway.  Not pictured is one of my favorite sculptures, Noguchi's Red Cube, and the Harriman Building in the background. 

Marker reads: "PROPERTY OF 140 BROADWAY CROSSING PERMISSION IS REVOKABLE AT WILL".

Marker reads: "PROPERTY OF 140 BROADWAY CROSSING PERMISSION IS REVOKABLE AT WILL".

I love this plaza. A few weeks ago I asked a long time New Yorker about the property markers at the edge of plazas, specifically the ones by Noguchi's Cube in front of 140 Broadway. He didn't know. Answer: Clue 20, a result of the 1961 Zoning Resolution that encouraged construction of broad plazas. You can imagine and appreciate why these plazas are so important to the City.

Another favorite spot in New York: 101 Spring Street in SoHo.

Clue 21: Where Donald Judd lived and worked when not in Marfa. 

Clue 21: Where Donald Judd lived and worked when not in Marfa. 

The neighborhood was originally factories. When artists in the 70s transformed the spaces in to lofts, it wasn't legal. It is permitted because of zoning amendments. Of course, the neighborhood is more international shopping destination than artists' lofts these days, but the zoning amendment helped transform the neighborhood to become what it is today. 

From there we raced uptown to the Garment District and Times Square. Then hustled from Time Square with a detour towards Rockefeller Center for Clue 15 and then back to 42nd and Fifth to get this shot with the answer just peeking out. 

Clue 7. Answer: Empire State Building. Stretching it for 2 points with the photo. The Empire State Building's iconic form is derivative of 1916 Zoning Resolution. 

Clue 7. Answer: Empire State Building. Stretching it for 2 points with the photo. The Empire State Building's iconic form is derivative of 1916 Zoning Resolution. 

Literally around the corner is Clue 7's Bonus: It has similar interpretation of Zoning Resolution and was the Tallest in the World when completed. From here we hopped in a couple of cabs.

We immediately jumped in a cab after this to head north and east with only 15 minutes left.

We immediately jumped in a cab after this to head north and east with only 15 minutes left.

Our cabbie who took us to 375 Park Avenue drove like a real New York Cabbie, weaving in and out of traffic with moxy. He even let us get out to snap our back to back photos in front of Seagram Building and Lever House before jumping back in to arrive at the next location, too far to walk if we were to reach the last 3 clues before 5pm. 

Clue 13: Seagram Building, 1958, served as model for future office development.

Clue 13: Seagram Building, 1958, served as model for future office development.

Clue 13 Bonus: Lever House, 1952, circumvented existing zoning requirements with 2-story block intersecting tower. 

Clue 13 Bonus: Lever House, 1952, circumvented existing zoning requirements with 2-story block intersecting tower. 

With 5 minutes to spare, we uploaded our last photo, Clue 24 (Citigroup Building in Queens, visible from UN Plaza), for 3 points. Afterwards we were all relieved, I think, to be finished. We had to get a picture of our whole group before we headed up to the reception at the Museum of the City of New York.

Group photo with our patient photographer along for the ride in front of UN Building. Not sure she knew what she was getting into, but she was wonderful!

Group photo with our patient photographer along for the ride in front of UN Building. Not sure she knew what she was getting into, but she was wonderful!

While we didn't win, we did finish above average and had SO much fun galavanting all over the City (including a ride on the Staten Island Ferry) in our customized t-shirts and learning bits that are so important for the Public to know. Can't wait to see the stats (and the answers)! 

 

 

 

#PartyFood

I realized the other day, when I couldn't bring myself to work on a couple of canvases, that much of my creative energy is spent in the kitchen these days. 

Here are three variations with most of the same ingredients. 

This is one of my favorites. The result of a happy accident. 

Mango Pesto Cucumber Bites

Mango Pesto Cucumber Bites

I thought the mango pesto hadn't turned out so great. As it was, it just needed to chill. Don't we all. Such a simple, nearly impossible to destroy, delightful bite. Ingredients: Cucumber, mango pesto, tomato, chopped basil, topped with crushed red pepper. Vegan, gluten-free, whole crowd pleaser. 

Pesto Crostini

Pesto Crostini

There must be a better name for this one, in the meantime it's a perfect snack, no matter its name. More gluten-free bread, pea mint pesto, red lettuce, tomato, sprouts, crushed red pepper, sesame seeds, pine nuts. Yum. Perfect summer party snack food. 

Pesto Bites with Picked Onion and Mint

Pesto Bites with Picked Onion and Mint

And then this gem. This time, gluten-free bread, some kind of pesto, tomato, crushed red pepper, sesame seeds, pine nuts, sprouts, chopped mint and pickled onion. 

All three of these could have been an avocado smash. That is a forthcoming blog post. Stay tuned. I love summertime eating and parties! Vegan and Gluten-free sometimes seem like dirty words, but they are in fact the opposite. Everything about these three variations is light, clean and appropriately filling.